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Driving Deaths Are Up: Ain't Nobody Got Time For That

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Get your motor running, head out on the highway, watch out for crazy drivers, and whatever distractions come your way! Let’s get right to it, driving is becoming a problem in a major way. People are in a hurry and sacrificing others’ safety while they’re at it. “Molly” can wait for a response about dinner, “Sal” from the next site will see you soon enough, and alert big boss “Mark” of your status before you get out on the road, it’ll be better for everyone in the long run.

Traffic related deaths have been at a steady increase for the past 6 months and are set to keep going up up and away all summer long. More driving, more traffic, more hassle. It’s easy to lose your cool but think of the alternative, ain’t nobody got time to become a part of that statistic.

Some quick tips to keep you out of harm’s way and keep you partying all summer long:

  • Cliché but true: DO NOT TEXT AND DRIVE, eyes on the road, don’t even make phone calls if you can avoid it
  • Long day ahead? Make sure your car is as up for the challenge as you are
  • Traffic is the worst: if your think it’ll be a busy travel day, take the road less traveled
  • Find a happy place: Don’t let road rage get the best of you, if anything it will make the drive even longer and dangerous depending on who you’re messing with
  • Going out? Designate a DD or call an Uber
  • Wear a seatbelt!

 


Is That Heat Stress? The Dangers of Rising Temperatures

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Are hallucinations, confusion and a big ol’ rash a part of your daily routine? Either you’ve been partying a little too hard (… or just enough) or heat stress might be a real concern at your job. While it may be difficult to tell apart from normal fatigue and perspiration at first, symptoms of heat stress can quickly escalate leaving workers defenseless and in serious danger.

Work obviously has to get done one way or another, however if you feel disoriented at all, DO NOT ignore it. Easily excusable aches and irritability can turn into vomiting and loss of coordination in a matter of 10 to 15 minutes. Once your body temperature rises above 106 degrees Fahrenheit death or permanent disability could begin to set in.

On hot summer days consider shifting work schedules to off peak heat and humidity hours. Have a designated shady rest area for lunch and breaks with plenty of cool water. Allow workers to wear a hat and light colored clothing. On the first few days of working in the heat, don’t overdo it. Allow your body to acclimate to the temperature and air quality. Once you begin working in these conditions on a consistent basis it may become easier, however this doesn’t mean heat stress is any less of a threat.

Always be aware of your body and try and look out for your co-workers heat stress is easily preventable. If you need a break, take a break.

 


 

Wisdom Really Does Come With Age: How to Keep Young Workers Safe

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Those darn whippersnappers always thinking they know everything and that their invincible. This line of thinking can get a young buck in a whole mess of trouble on the job if they aren’t careful. In 2012, 375 workers less than 24 years of age died from work-related injuries and the rate for emergency department-treated occupational injuries of young workers is approximately two times higher than among workers 25 years and older. Sure it is important for young workers to get into the field and start making their way in the world but it is also important to be mindful that they are doing it safely.

Often it is new and inexperienced workers that have the hardest time asking questions, or voicing concerns about problems, even when it’s regarding safety. Ensuring that all workers feel comfortable talking about issues they face should be a top priority for all employers.

Aside from providing open lines of communication free from shaming or ridicule for those who do voice their opinions, consider pairing a young worker up with a more experienced facility veteran to provide a more personal one on one shadowing teaching process. This will help boost camaraderie, giving a young worker a peer instead of an authority figure to reach out to.

The value of bringing up young workers correctly in your business provides a wealth of knowledge and expertise in the future at your facility. Building that relationship of trust and understanding from the beginning will foster great workplace moral and an ownership and dedication to the job at hand.

Reference this OSHA Young Workers Rights site for more helpful information and resources.


Celebrating Summer Safely Quiz

Summer is finally starting to rev up, and with the holiday weekend approaching it is important to keep in mind how to celebrate safely. From fun in the sun, grilling and chilling, and ending the night with a big bang, test your knowledge on how to make your festivities as safe and exciting as possible without the added hassle of an accident.

Celebrating Safely Quiz

 


 

Workplace Safety News Roundup

Workplace Safety News Roundup

Keeping track of new OSHA regulations and taking advantage of supplemental safety training and reading materials makes a big difference in the success of the programs you implement in your workplace. Seeing what others are doing both for the better and worse help mold an all encompassing safety initiative. Here is a sampling of some of the news buzzing around workplace safety this month.

Machine Safety Survey Results from the NSC

The Business and Industry Division of the National Safety Council recently conducted a survey of safety professionals regarding issues of machine safety, safety interlocks and used equipment safety. The results indicate that safety compliance still relies heavily on experience and workplace tradition.

Read More Here

OSHA: Proper Protection Could Have Saved DuPont Workers Killed by Gas

Four workers killed by a lethal gas in November 2014 would be alive today had their employer, DuPont, taken steps to protect them, say OSHA investigators. OSHA cited DuPont for 11 safety violations and identified scores of safety upgrades the company must undertake to prevent future accidents at its Lannate/API manufacturing building in La Porte, Tex. The company employs 313 workers who manufacture crop protection materials and chemicals there.

Read More Here

Company held in contempt after barring OSHA inspectors

A foundry, its owner and three members of its safety consultant company have been found in criminal contempt by U.S. District Judge Beth Phillips after disobeying a court order to allow federal inspectors to investigate a report of an employee at the foundry with an elevated blood lead.

Read More here

Safety Culture – It’s About the People

Many companies tend to ignore a weak safety culture for years for a variety of reasons, and then decide some action needs to be taken as a result of an unplanned or unexpected event. Often, some attempt is made to improve the culture by arbitrarily directing funds and resources into training, staff and equipment. By doing this, companies expect a reduction in the frequency and severity of incidents and an overall increase in commitment from their employees. Long-term, this typically leads to disappointment and falling short of the goal.

Read More here

Contractor: My competitors have waged an OSHA war

A roofing contractor says competing companies have started an “OSHA war” by reporting violations of their competitors. He says he now has no choice but to “stoop to their level.” How do you fight an OSHA war? Here’s one potential solution: Don’t have any OSHA violations. Up to one in four OSHA inspections are categorized as “no violations.” So even if your competitors are out to get you by calling OSHA, it doesn’t mean you have to get fined.

Read More Here

Interim policy allows limited use of pre-2012 compliant hazcom labels

An OSHA interim policy issued May 29 allows limited continued use of hazard communication labels that are not yet in compliance with the revised Hazard Communication Standard released in 2012. The compliance date for use of updated labels was June 1. However, some manufacturers, importers and distributors say they are still waiting to receive classification and Safety Data Sheet information from upstream suppliers.

Read more here